Category: Posts-By-Category

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DB2 Memory Area In-Depth: The Package Cache

The package cache is just one memory area that DB2 offers to tune memory usage for a DB2 database. This article is a deep dive into this memory area. What is the Package Cache The package cache is an area of memory that DB2 uses to store access plans. Access plans are detailed strategies for how DB2 will get to...

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Static SQL vs Dynamic SQL in Stored Procedures

Updated 13 September 2016 to use more correct wording around how and when the access plan is generated and reused. As a new DB2 for LUW DBA or developer it can take a while to understand the difference between static and dynamic SQL. I’d like to use an example in a stored procedure to explain. Example The same SQL can...

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Using Vendor Backup Solutions with DB2 for LUW

There are an astonishing number of vendor solutions available with specific interfaces for DB2. Working with a variety of clients, I see and help to evaluate and implement a variety of backup solutions. I thought I’d share some of the things I look for and work on as part of an implementation. Sometimes the DBA has input on a solution...

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A Physical DBA Reviewing DDL

My background comes largely from the physical DBA world, though I’ve gained logical DBA skills over the years. Any reasonably mature IT organization will have a DBA at some level or another review SQL and DDL before it is implemented in production. Why Reviewing SQL and DDL is Important Reviewing SQL and DDL is important because there are some very...

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DB2 Basics: Patching DB2

Like any software, DB2 requires frequent patching. A database should be one of the most secure parts of any enterprise, and keeping it secure means keeping up with the fixes that are delivered in fix packs. Fix Packs DB2 delivers many things through fixpacks, including: Security Fixes Bug Fixes New Functionality – though IBM goes back and forth on this...

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DB2 Basics: Stored Procedures, Functions, Modules, Oh My!

DB2 has a number of objects where that use procedural SQL. IBM calls this SQL PL, not to be confused with PL/SQL or TSQL, both similar concepts. Much PL/SQL also works in DB2, if you have the Oracle compatibility vector enabled. The various types of objects have different places and purposes, and it can be useful to understand the use...