Category: Explains

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LBAC – Label Based Access Control

To go with my recent article on RCAC/FGAC, I thought I would do some similar work using LBAC and see what I could learn about it and the differences between the two. What is LBAC Label Based Access Control essentially adds a column to a table that labels each row (think confidential, secret, top secret), and then grants uses of...

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DB2 Fine-Grained and Row Access Control (FGAC/RCAC)

DB2 10.1 introduced a new feature commonly called RCAC (Row and Column Access Control) or FGAC(Fine-Grained Access Control). This is a bit less labor intensive to support than LBAC (Label Based Access Control), and solves some of the problems with LBAC. It allows a finer level of access control than the standard DB2 permissions scheme. RCAC consists of two major...

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DB2 Explain Output in Another Format

I’m always keeping an eye on Twitter to catch interesting bits of news, and that includes watching cross platform information. I find it fascinating to compare DB2 to other RDMBSes, and saw a great article from Use the Index, Luke (fabulous name!) – Seven Surprising Findings About DB2. I’d recommend reading it. One of the things that stood out most...

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Example of A Clustering Low-Cardinality Index Helping Query Performance

The request from the developers was something along the lines of “Help, Ember, this query needs to perform better”. Sometimes the query I’m working on is not one that shows up as a problem from the database administrator’s perspective, but one that is especially important in some part of application functioning. In this case, this query is related to the...

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DB2 Basics: db2top

There are a lot of things I can cover on db2top, and probably more tips and tricks using db2top than many other tools out there. Searching the web on db2top gets more good results than on many other db2 topics. I thought I’d start with some of the basics. Using db2top requires some general knowledge of how db2 works. I...

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When Index Scans Attack!

We all know that table scans can be (but aren’t always) a negative thing. I have spent less time worrying about index scans, though. Index access = good, right? I thought I’d share a recent scenario where an index scan was very expensive. Maybe still better than a table scan, but with one index, I reduced the impact of a...

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The Danger of FETCH FIRST ROW ONLY

There are a a vast array of things you can do in SQL. But just because you can doesn’t always mean that you should. I recently ran into an interesting situation with FETCH FIRST ROW ONLY. How the Problem Manifested The day after new code was deployed, a production database system that usually runs with 40% CPU utilization or less...

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Using a Statistical View to Improve Query Performance

Sometimes just using the index advisor and a bit of common sense, you can address SQL performance issues. But other times, you have to dig a bit deeper. I recently found the following query and 300 of its closest cousins (differing only in the length of the second in-list) were eating 30% of the CPU time used by queries on...